Tag Archives: fantasy

What would Perseus Do? See the ‘Clash of the Titans’ trailer!

11 Nov

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Nov 11th, 2009–

Ye children of the Nineteen-Hundred and Eighties gather round! Behold the glimpse of things soon to pass and the return of a friend from the desert of memory! Clash of the Titans has returned….sort of. Continue reading

Sci-Fi thriller starts strong but strays too far outside ‘The Box’

6 Nov

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Richard Kelly’s The Box brings with it some good news and bad news. The good is that it’s about 100% better than his last movie, Southland Tales. The bad is that despite a really solid opening hour or so, it never duplicates the kind of alternate-reality mind trip that Kelly struck paydirt with on Donnie Darko.

 I’m just going to link you over to Atomic Popcorn and you can read my more in-depth, and mostly spoiler-free, thoughts over there.

THE ATOMIC POPCORN REVIEW OF ‘THE BOX’

Continue reading

‘Prince of Persia:Curse of the Black Pearl’ trailer arrives!

3 Nov

Nov. 3rd, 2009–

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Wow. I’m wondering if Disney even knows how to cut good trailers anymore.

I wish I could be more excited for this one. Afterall, it’s one of the big summer tentpole movies.

It took me  a few moments to process Donnie Darko as a swashbuckler, but more than that, it’s the 1999 Mummy sand fx that seem out of place here. I’m not digging the excessive use of digital imagery and the central plot seems like a cookie-cutter genre affair. For a movie with its own established franchise, Persia looks a bit too much like LOTR, Indiana Jones and Pirates of the Caribbean stirred into a giant CGI stew. Continue reading

Ray Bradbury’s The Halloween Tree

31 Oct

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Happy Halloween everyone! Here in Baltimore it’s a foggy, overcast morning. Here’s hoping the sun comes and we can see some of those brilliant autumn leaves illuminated properly. Hard to believe the end of October is here already.  In keeping with the holiday, I’ve dug up the Cartoon Network adaptation of Ray Bradbury’s The Halloween Tree. A wonderful and childlike animation that offers the cultural and historical context for the holiday wrapped up in a story of young friends venturing out to save one of their own.

Bradbury has been evoking smoky autumn evenings and golden, leaf-strewn afternoons for years in his work and his affection for this particular holiday is evident. He doesn’t skimp on the ghouls here but it isn’t scary and it offers some educational details about the traditions and heritage that lurk underneath the candy-giving and costume-wearing.

As it isn’t available on DVD, I’ve put the entire thing up right here. If you get the opportunity, check it out. And keep your ears peeled for Leonard Nimoy as Moundshroud, the foreboding old man who owns the Halloween Tree. Continue reading

Movie Review: Odd and lovely ‘Wild Things’

29 Oct

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cinemagrade A+Spike Jonze’s Where the Wild Things Are is a strange and wonderful creation, like the book that inspired it. I can understand, however, if many are disappointed by it or don’t care for it at all. Jonze and scriptwriter Dave Eggers have taken the 9 page, 9 sentence Maurice Sendak book about a little boy who retreats into his imagination and transformed it into a 90 minute film about the complex emotions and erratic feelings that drive our early childhood. Continue reading

AMAD-Horror Edition: Nomads

15 Oct

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cinemagrade bSo, this is the movie responsible for Predator, Die Hard and Hunt for Red October? In a way, yes it is. Those three films are all pinnacles of the action genre; peerless giants, and all three were directed by John McTiernan. Predator, in fact, would be made one year later and it’s this little supernatural thriller that nabbed John the job to helm that film. So, if you give it nothing else, give it that: it jumpstarted McTiernan’s career and got him a gig directing one of the seminal sci-fi action pics of our time. The good news is that Nomads is also a highly creepy, engaging thriller, well worth seeking out if you haven’t seen it. Continue reading

Trailer Round-Up: The Expendables, Toy Story 3, Parnassus and more..

14 Oct

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Oct 14th, 2009–

Welcome back to another installment of Trailer Round-Up. This one is gonna be short and sweet but not lacking in content. Here are some of the latest and greatest trailers buzzing out there on the net.

Of most notice right now is the sneak peak at Sly Stallone’s 80s-charged action flick that brings the Italian Stallon into the orbit of action mainstays like Jason Statham, Jet Li, Dolph Lundgren and then throws in colorful faces like Mickey Rourke, Eric Roberts, Terry Crewes and a hinted at Ahnuld cameo. The trailer itself looks like what you would expect, and chances are it will be all that the fanbase hopes for and everything those waiting for Stallone ‘s return to his indie  roots (ala Rocky)  feared it would be. Continue reading

AMAD-Horror Edition: Kwaidan

10 Oct

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October 10th, 2009–

Would you like to hear a ghost story?

 Look around; the days are soon to shorten, the leaves to color and then fall, and the chill of winter is already intruding. There is really no better time for one. And this one, I promise, you will like. It’s a story you have probably heard before. But not like this. Never quite like this. Continue reading

Bloglins: Talk about the new episodes of ‘Supernatural’ and ‘The Office’ here!

8 Oct

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October 8th,2009–

Slowly pulling out of the trenches of the dreaded flu over here. I’m about 3 in debt on that AMAD column and hoping to knock some out later tonight. Until then, here’s the return of Bloglins, modified. The gist is simple. I’m not gonna do much talking, but instead the comments section is the forum to hear your thoughts on two of tonight’s television offerings. Continue reading

AMAD-Horror Edition: Eyes Without A Face

5 Oct

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Oct 4th,2009–

cinemagrade A-I’m a little surprised that I never saw Georges Franju’s Eyes Without a Face before this. With its French art-house sensibilities and Universal horror movie tropes all jammed together into a crusty old shell of pulp contrivance, the movie is a monster mash gone wild. Rejected by the snobby French critics of the time and dumped over here in the U.S. to double-bill with The Manster, this psychological thriller was far ahead of its time. My wife and I were legitimately shocked by how graphic the surgery sequences are and how stately and poetic the rest of the film is. The movie hides its madness underneath  a high-class painterly veneer but make no mistake–it delivers a wicked jolt. Continue reading