Tag Archives: fantasy

Now Playing: Percy Jackson, Frozen and a pathetic excuse for Valentine’s Day

12 Feb

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Morning all. How’s it going? I just put up a review of the new Wolfman and have a few more treats coming up today, including a top ten, a Retro review and The Weekly Creepy. However, in an effort to give you a look see into a few more of the new films opening today, I’m putting up links to my work over at Atomic Popcorn where I take a look at Percy Jackson, Adam Green’s Frozen, and Valentine’s Day. I’ll  post a link and the trailers for each below, complete with the matching Cinematropolis rating.

Check them out! Continue reading

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Now Playing: Ah-ooo! Geek ‘Wolf’ in London!

11 Feb

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The Wolfman (R) 103 min. Directed by: Joe Johnston Written by:  Andrew Kevin Walker & David Self  Starring: Benicio Del Toro, Anthony Hopkins, Emily Blunt, Hugo Weaving Cinematography: Original Score: Danny Elfman

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There is a scene in the new Wolfman where Emily Blunt runs through the foggy night forest, pursued by Del Toro’s slobbering beast. She runs as far as she can, and finds herself balanced precariously at the edge of a treacherous cliff that overlooks a roaring waterfall. Behind her, the monster comes loping and snarling through the underbrush. She has nowhere to go, so she turns pleadingly to face the attacker, her hands concealing the weapon behind her back.

I love moments like this, and the beautifully lush cinematography, Elfman’s shrieking gothic score, as well as Blunt’s wide, staring eyes make it a thing of haunting beauty. When I was a kid, this was the stuff of my dreams and nightmares. In fact, that’s the biggest problem with all of Joe Johnston’s The Wolfman. Less a  rendition of the original 1940’s classic and more a high-gloss version of a geeky fan-boy’s interior fantasy life, this Wolf is a total howler. It’s still fun but the odd subtext trumps the dark tragedy of its predecessor. Continue reading

Sam Raimi to Direct ‘The Shadow’?

1 Feb

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Monday February 1st, 2010–

Ok, there’s not alot of real news to this one, but thats just fine as it allows more conjecture on our part here. After being ousted from that giant Spidey snafu (which is probably just as well for him), Raimi is a director in the midst of several projects, and he’s been linked up to produce this one over at Paramount since 2007. With a script by Slavash Farahani, it is now being rumored that Raimi himself might direct this latest incarnation of the 1930’s pulp hero. Will this happen before or after World of Warcraft? Continue reading

Bartleby’s Best Films of 2009

24 Jan

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Yes sir, I know I’m quite late with this, but this past month has been loaded down with surprises—both good and bad—that have drawn my attention away from the blog. Hopefully, this will be the last bit of procrastination the site sees for awhile. The plan is to get back into a daily posting framework, and if that’s successful, move to a legitimate website sometime in February. Until then, here’s my belated list of  2009’s best films.

I’ve heard many complain that this past year was a weak one cinematically speaking, and in a late scrabble to identify the potential ‘award winners’ for Oscar season many are coming up short with candidates. Well, bah! to that I say. Regarding the medium of film as a whole, I see 2009 as nothing less than a fantastic success.

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Now Playing: Jackson Rattles ‘The Lovely Bones’

15 Jan

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The Lovely Bones (PG-13) 120 min. Directed by: Peter Jackson Written by: Fran Walsh and Philippa Boyens Starring: Saoirse Ronan, Mark Wahlberg, Rachel Weisz, Stanley Tucci, Susan Sarandon Cinematography: Andrew Lesnie Original Score: Brian Eno

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Peter Jackson’s The Lovely Bones is a decidedly creepy and insubstantial adaptation of Alice Sebold’s best-selling novel. Recounting the after-life of young Susie Salmon, a 14-yr old Pennsylvania girl who is raped and murdered by a neighbor, Bones is being sold as a kind of bittersweet fantasy with an eye on family tragedy. Beautifully photographed, with a haunting wistful score by Brian Eno, Jackson and company bring all of their technical expertise to bear on the film and attend to its tricky narrative taboos with a  delicate hand. The acting is mostly very good, with the centerpiece being a thoughtful and sweet performance by Saoirse Ronan, who seems to have a bright cinematic future ahead of her. And yet, for all of this, The Lovely Bones falls flat on its face. Hard. Continue reading

Movie Review: Ledger’s final performance haunts the ‘Imaginarium’

14 Jan

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The Imaginarium of Dr. Parnassus (PG-13) Directed by: Terry Gilliam. Written by: Terry Gilliam & Charles McKeown Starring: Christopher Plummer, Lily Cole, Heath Ledger, Tom Waits, Verne Troyer, Jude Law, Johnny Depp, Colin Farrell

 

  It’s been a long time since I’ve seen a Terry Gilliam film that has stirred in me any sense of wonder or joy.

At last then, here is a new picture from the director that does both of those things. For that reason alone The Imaginarium of Dr. Parnassus is a work to treasure. Filled with elaborate, mind-boggling visuals and moments of madcap fantasy, Parnassus is also one of the more thoughtful Gilliam concoctions; taking the concept of the storyteller trapped within a world of the mundane and tweaking it to create a film that feels like his most personal yet. Continue reading

Movie Review: Vampires that don’t suck in ‘Daybreakers’

8 Jan

 

Daybreakers (R) 108 min. Written & Directed by: The Spiereg Brothers. Starring: Ethan Hawke, Willem Dafoe, Sam Neill, Isabel Lucas Cinematography: Ben Nott  Score: Christopher Gordon

At a Christmas get-together this year, one of my extended family members told me he had seen the site and would probably read it more if I didn’t review so many damn vampire movies. At last inventory, I’ve technically reviewed 2, but one of those was New Moon so I’m not sure it counts. Eitherway, it seemed to be the gore and tedious nature of the genre that had done him in.

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