Tag Archives: comedy

Trailer Round-Up: Solomon Kane, Princess and the Frog, Descent 2, Up in the Air, more…

11 Sep

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September 11th, 2009–

Hey everyone. I hope your week has gone well and that the weekend is even better. Here were are again with a new bunch of trailers. There’s a new look at Disney’s latest 2D animated film and one more trailer proving that George Clooney never stops working. Best of all, there’s finally a peek at Solomon Kane, the fantasy adventure based off Robert E. Howard characters. Lets start first with the followup to Neil Marshall’s 2005 horror classic The DescentContinue reading

Trailer Round-Up: The Boondock Saints 2:All Saint’s Day, Gentlemen Broncos, Agora and More…

3 Sep

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September 3rd, 2009–

Good morning everyone! I don’t know about anywhere else, but its a wonderfully temperate and beautiful pre-fall morning over here in Baltimore. I wan’t expecting it get to cooler so soon, but I’m hoping it sticks around. The promise of autumn is right around the corner, and I’m eager for it to arrive. Winter, however, can feel free to hold off for a bit.

 Anyway, in an attempt to streamline and organize the blog a bit more, I’ve decided on doing regular features that will be repeated each week. The first of these is Trailer Round-Up, which grabs five or six new and interesting up-coming movie trailers from around the web and plops them all down right here at Cinematropolis. I’ll try to stay as current as I can, although due to my absence all last week there are a few here that I missed. First up for this week, it’s another Direct-to-DVD sequel to a cult classic–hooray! Continue reading

Fantasia 2009 Review: ‘Daytime Drinking’ Without the Hangover

24 Jul

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Daytime Drinking (NR) 116 min. Written and Directed by: Young-Seok Noh Starring: Kang-Hee Kim, Sam-Dong Song Cinematography and Original Music by: Young-Seok Noh

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 After seeing so many of the Fantasia Fest entries this year (and I’ve got a ton of reviews on the way) one begins to notice the overarching differences between the various strains of Asian film. China seems to still be primarily focusing energy on martial arts and historical action pictures; Japan is all over the wacky place with some really bold dramas and alot of comic-book fueled madness; Thailand is mostly concerned with how to actually kill its stuntmen during filming; and then, there is South Korea. In the past five or six years Korean film has leapt to the forefront of the cinematic landscape. Producing work both provoking, artistic and just plain-out entertaining, Korean filmmaking is in the midst of a significant evolution forward. When I look at movies like Oldboy, The Chaser, or the work of Kim Ki-Duk, what I see reminds me of the artistic explosion that occurred in the film world here in America during the 1970s. That era bought about a new viewpoint through which artists considered the opportunities the medium of film afforded. Continue reading

Celebrating the Non-Death of Goldblum: Jeff’s Ten Best Roles

1 Jul

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July 1st, 2009-

Last week was a rough one for the celeberity world; three taken in the space of only a few days. After Ed McMahon and Farrah Fawcett, Jackson’s death hit like a ton of bricks. The news was sad to be sure, but I hadn’t been keeping much track of Michael recently and had never been the kind of fan others were. Then, when my wife and I got home that night I was greeted by emails and news that Jeff Goldblum had died too. WHAT?? HOW? I was initially heartbroken–I’ve been following his career ever since The Fly and believed he was poised to do something big; afterall the last few projects had been some of his best work even if they flew under the radar of most. Of all the news, this one hit me the hardest. Crap. Jeff Goldlbum. People are only gonna remember him for Independence Day and Jurassic Park, I thought. Well, no they won’t. From here on out we can remember the time we thought Goldblum died. Continue reading

Now Playing: ‘Big Man Japan’ trades zero for hero

29 Jun

 

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 Giant monsters tromping around wrecking cities sounds like alot more fun than it actually is. I’ve been listening to nearly every beleagured friend who has seen the new Transformers movie complain; ‘it’s just giant things punching each other–that’s it!’ Well, duh. In their case, though, I have the perfect remedy; Hitoshi Matsumoto’s Dai Niiponjin, or the english translation, Big Man Japan. Continue reading

Paul Giamatti leaves his soul out in the ‘Cold’! Trailer and pics

22 Jun

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June 22, 2009–

Last month when I did this list for the top science fiction movies of the summer, I wasn’t aware Cold Souls was slated for an August release date .  This looks like one quirky movie; Paul Giamatti stars as a fictional version of himself who is feeling weighed down by soul and ends up visiting a company where his soul can be extracted and stored in cryo-freeze. When he realizes that life without a soul is more troublesome than life with, he goes back to get it back. However, by this point its been accidentally shipped to Russia where it resides with a young dancer. Continue reading

Movie Review: ‘Land’ gets lost in silliness

18 Jun

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Land of the Lost (2009) (PG-13) 101 min.  directed by: Brad Siberling. Starring: Will Ferrell, Ana Friel, Danny McBride, John Boylan. cinematography: Dion Beebe original score: Michael Giacchino.

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I wasn’t expecting epic storytelling or thoughtful science when I went into Land of the Lost.  It obviously doesn’t have those things and neither did the original series. What I was hoping for was a reasonably exciting adventure, some good laughs and most importantly a creative use of the prehistoric setting. Unfortunately, what we get instead is a series of Will Ferrel bathroom jokes, out of place sexual references and a ‘plot’ that basically consists of notes taken on a napkin while browsing through an episode of the original series. Continue reading

Woody and Little Miss Sunshine VS. the Zombies

12 Jun

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June 12th 2009-

Zombies, zombies and more zombies. When exactly did the big EVENT happen that rendered our world overrun by the flesh eaters? I’m not sure I can even pinpoint the exact moment anymore.  I think it was 28 Days Later right, that brought the brain-munchers back? And then Dawn of the Dead, Shaun of the Dead and every third movie after that. We’ve had aussie zombies (Undead), french non-violent existential zombies (They Came Back), and scottish Billy Connelly as a dead pet (Fido).  And, one guesses, we won’t be rid of them soon. And as long as we keep getting little gems like the recent Dance of the Dead I’m game. Continue reading

Movie Review: Biel, Firth and Thomas make ‘Virtue’ easy to like

8 Jun

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Easy Virtue (2009) PG-13. 93 min. Directed by: Stephan Elliot. Written by: Stephan Elliot and Sheridan Jobbins. Starring: Colin Firth, Kristen Scott Thomas, Jessica Biel, Ben Barnes. Cinematography:Martin Kenzie. Original music by: Marius Devries.

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Stephan Elliot’s adaptation of Noel Coward’s  Easy Virtue is the epitome of summer art-house; light, frothy, frequently bombastic and as enduring as a popsicle in August. And for most of its running time it’s a perfectly refreshing bit of blockbuster counter-programming. Elliot, the director of the quirky Priscilla, Queen of the Desert (and not much else really) takes all the best satirical bits from Coward’s 1924 play and adds a few new wrinkles to update the plot. He also manages to nab an eclectic cast that include pros like Kristen Scott Thomas and Colin Firth (not slumming it for a change) and the luminous Jessica Biel, who while slightly miscast, shows acting chops not previously seen. With the help of  cinematographer Martin Kenzie, who captures the idylls of posh British manor life in bright, lush details, Elliot crafts a fast-moving, witty comedy that maximizes its cast but ends up minimizing the strength of Coward’s observations by dilluting the tale’s substantial edge. Continue reading

Dude Fest and ‘Lebowski’ abide in Baltimore this Saturday!

3 Jun

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June 3rd, 2009-

You want a toe? I can get you a toe, believe me. There are ways, Dude. You don’t wanna know about it, believe me. 
Hell, I can get you a toe by 3 o’clock this afternoon… with nail polish. These …amateurs! ” – Walter Sobchack, The Big Lebowski

 Carving out it’s own unique niche in American pop culture,  the penultimate Coen brothers epic of  mere mortals facing the darkness of nihilism and the random chaos of the universe has won accolades right and left since the time of its release. No Country for Old Men, right? Ha! We are talking The Big Lebowski here, the Coen’s laugh-out loud 98 comedy that combines post-modernist straw grabbing, stoner humor and noir potboiler with a savage, glowering John Goodman thrown in for added effect. But like I need to tell you. Continue reading