Tag Archives: alcohol

Dan Aykroyd Confronts Spirits in Baltimore Tomorrow! Be There!

10 Sep

Ok, I’m going to admit right up front that this is weird news. The advertisement above is for something called Crystal Head Vodka, and it represents one of the latest ventures from actor Dan Aykroyd. When this first hit the internet, everyone assumed it was a viral video, but I’m pretty sure that Dan truly believes the stuff he’s talking about in the ad. I’ve heard the man on NPR and a few other radio programs over the years and he’s definitely a big proponent of the paranormal and supernatural. And since you can most definitely purchase Crystal Head Vodka, which comes in a carved glass bottle that looks like the fabled Crystal Skulls, it isn’t a joke or a movie promo.

Do I think it’s weird that someone would try to boost awareness of the paranormal by selling vodka in a skull bottle? I dunno, I bet that sort of thing worked quite well in the 1800s. Weirder to me is that Aykroyd completed the video with a straight face, and that he’s actually going to be in Baltimore tomorrow promoting this product. Continue reading

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Fantasia 2009 Review: ‘Daytime Drinking’ Without the Hangover

24 Jul

daytimedrinking1

Daytime Drinking (NR) 116 min. Written and Directed by: Young-Seok Noh Starring: Kang-Hee Kim, Sam-Dong Song Cinematography and Original Music by: Young-Seok Noh

cinemagrade b+

 After seeing so many of the Fantasia Fest entries this year (and I’ve got a ton of reviews on the way) one begins to notice the overarching differences between the various strains of Asian film. China seems to still be primarily focusing energy on martial arts and historical action pictures; Japan is all over the wacky place with some really bold dramas and alot of comic-book fueled madness; Thailand is mostly concerned with how to actually kill its stuntmen during filming; and then, there is South Korea. In the past five or six years Korean film has leapt to the forefront of the cinematic landscape. Producing work both provoking, artistic and just plain-out entertaining, Korean filmmaking is in the midst of a significant evolution forward. When I look at movies like Oldboy, The Chaser, or the work of Kim Ki-Duk, what I see reminds me of the artistic explosion that occurred in the film world here in America during the 1970s. That era bought about a new viewpoint through which artists considered the opportunities the medium of film afforded. Continue reading